Arb & FA

Last updated on 7/18/2014

Service time is shown as Y.DDD (meaning a player with 3 years, 89 days of service would have 3.089 years of service). Additionally, 172 days counts as a full year of service and no more than 1 year of service can be earned in a single season (meaning that if a player has 4.171 years of service at the start of the season, the most he could have by the season's end is 5.171 years of service).

Players on pace to be Free Agents following the 2014 season:

PlayerProj ServiceNotes
Bobby Abreu16.136 yrs 
Chris Young8.045 yrs 
Daisuke Matsuzaka7.033 yrs 

Players on pace to be Arbitration Eligible following the 2014 season:

PlayerProj ServiceTypeEst SalaryNotes
Bobby Parnell5.132 yrs3rd & final arb year
-
 
Daniel Murphy5.109 yrs3rd & final arb year
-
Eric Young4.123 yrs2nd arb year
-
Taylor Teagarden4.120 yrs2nd arb year
-
Dana Eveland4.029 yrs2nd arb year
-
Dillon Gee4.028 yrs2nd arb year
-
Buddy Carlyle4.003 yrs2nd arb year
-
Ruben Tejada3.171 yrs2nd arb year
-
Former Super 2
Lucas Duda3.137 yrs2nd arb year
-
Former Super 2
Jenrry Mejia2.140 yrs1st arb year
-
Likely Super 2
Anthony Recker2.128 yrs1st arb year
-
Potential Super 2
Carlos Torres2.114 yrs1st arb year
-
Potential Super 2

Note - The projected cutoff for Super 2 status in 2014 is 2.128 yrs, per MLBTR.
Note - The cutoff for Super 2 status in 2013 was 2.122 yrs.
Note - The cutoff for Super 2 status in 2012 was 2.139 yrs.

Note - For players listed as being in their final arbitration year, it is assumed that they will get the necessary ML service time next season to pass the 6 year service mark and thus be eligible for Major League free agency.

Note - For most players, the 1st arbitration year is defined as 3.000 to 3.171 years of service, 2nd as 4.000 to 4.171, and 3rd as 5.000 to 5.171. For Super Twos, the 1st arbitration year is defined as 2.000 to 2.171 years of service, 2nd as 3.000 to 3.171, 3rd as 4.000 to 4.171, and 4th as 5.000 to 5.171. This is regardless of the number of times the player has actually been arbitration eligible. For example, if a non-Super Two player has 3.000 years of service, he's in his 1st arbitration year. If he accumulates 150 days of service the following year, he will have 3.150 years of service that offseason, and will still be listed as being in his 1st arbitration year, despite it technically being the 2nd time he is arbitration eligible.



Arbitration
Players become eligible for salary arbitration once they have accrued 3 years of Major League service time. Additionally, a subset of players with less than 3 years of service is also eligible. To be arbitration eligible as a Super Two, one must be in the top 22% by service time among players with more than 2 years, but less than 3 years of service who have earned at least 86 days of service in the past season.

Free Agency
Players become eligible for free agency once they have accrued 6 years of Major League service time. Teams retain the right to make a qualifying offer to these players. A qualifying offer is a one-year contract valued at the average of the top 125 MLB salaries from the prior year (in 2012, that was roughly $13.3M). If the player rejects the qualifying offer, he becomes a free agent, however the team that made him the qualifying offer is entitled to a compensation draft pick immediately after the end of the first round of the upcoming draft whould he sign a Major League contract elsewhere. The team signing such a free agent would forfeit its first eligible draft pick (i.e. its first pick outside the Top 10 overall).


Thanks to Jeff Euston and his terrific site Cot's Contracts, without which these lists would not be as accurate.